The Noble Tree Fir

Mythbusters: Ten Biggest Myths About Christmas Trees

Quick Tree Facts

Environmental Debate: Why Real Trees are Better for the Environment

Fake Trees: What You Don't Know Can Hurt You

Tree Care Tips

Holiday Safety Facts

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Christmas Trees

Real Trees are Recyclable

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about
Christmas Trees

(Q) I can't seem to find the tree that I want. It is often referred to as a Charlie Brown Tree because of its sparse look with short needles. I love these trees and don't know what they are or who might have one for sale.

(A) The sparse look is dependent somewhat upon the genetics of the tree, but mostly through the shearing practices of the grower. The more open, less dense look is starting to become more popular among consumers, so the Christmas Tree farmers will be working to meet that demand; however, the average tree takes 7 to 10 years to get to 6 or 7 feet high and the majority of consumers still want a full, thick tree. Check with farms in your area and ask them if they have a "less sheared" tree or one that "would be graded a cull". The grower will understand what you are looking for.

(Q) Isn't it bad for the environment to cut down a tree and use it for Christmas?

(A) You have 2 choices: First, you can use a renewable, recyclable natural product grown on farms throughout North America; or, you can use a non-renewable, non-biodegradable, plastic and metal product made in a Chinese factory. You pick. It is much better environmentally to use a natural agricultural crop and recycle it after the Holidays.

(Q) I thought I'd buy a living tree with its roots intact and plant it after Christmas so I don't have to kill a tree. How do I do that?

(A) First of all, you're not "killing" a tree by using a Real Christmas Tree. Unfortunately many people have the misconception that Christmas Trees are cut down from the forest. Real Christmas Trees are actually grown as crops, just like corn or wheat, and raised on a farm. Once they are harvested, new seedlings are planted to replace harvested trees. These would NOT have been planted if trees hadn't been harvested the previous year.

If you need landscape trees anyway, then a rooted tree may be a good option.

(Q) Where can I recycle my tree after Christmas?

(A) Successful tree recycling programs are coordinated on a local basis. In most communities, the news outlets (TV stations and newspapers and radio) will provide the info on drop off locations and dates or any curbside pick up programs.

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The Noble Tree Fir | Mythbusters: Ten Biggest Myths About Christmas Trees | Quick Tree Facts | Environmental Debate: Why Real Trees are Better for the Environment | Fake Trees: What You Don't Know Can Hurt You | Tree Care Tips |
Holiday Safety Facts
| Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Christmas Trees |
Real Trees are Recyclable
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